Yellow fever vaccination

Latest update: - Authors: Ula Maniewski-Kelner

The yellow fever vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine (Stamaril®) and should therefore not be used in certain immune disorders.

Vaccination schedule

The vaccine must be administered at least ten days prior to arrival.

A single reinforcing vaccination is recommended when returning to an endemic region.

When is yellow fever vaccine vaccination recommended?

The vaccine is recommended for travellers to countries where yellow fever is present, even when vaccination is not compulsory.

Vaccination is recommended from the age of 9 months and may exceptionally be given from 6 months. At younger ages, the vaccine is contraindicated. Vaccination is possible for pregnant women if there is a real risk. If you are breastfeeding, consult a doctor and ask whether vaccination is indicated.

In some countries, yellow fever does not occur, but vaccination is mandatory if you have recently been to a country where yellow fever is present. This may also apply to a stopover in an airport. 

If vaccination is not possible due to medical reasons, you are usually advised not to travel to a yellow fever risk area. Consult with your doctor.

Administration

The vaccine can only be administered at an official yellow fever vaccination centre.

A yellow fever vaccination is always registered in an International Certificate of Vaccination and Prophylaxis. This will be checked in countries where vaccination is compulsory. The certificate is valid for life.

Side effects

  • About 20% of those vaccinated have mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, muscle pain, headache or nausea after a few days. These can be treated with paracetamol if necessary and disappear within a few days.
  • Very rarely, serious side effects occur, especially in people over 60 years old and in certain medical conditions.
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